The Call Up

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November 7, 2011 3:30 pm
New York Magazine, how do you know everything I want to read about?  First, Steinem: A couple of things struck me about this article.  The infighting!  Oh my god.  Are we feminist enough? was a question constantly being asked.  And everyone had an opinion.  More than anything, Ms. magazine was successful because it was the product of a specific vision and adhered to that, regardless of whether it was popular or would alienate a certain audience.  Feminism is intrinsically alienating.  If you’re a mom, you’re not radical enough.  If you’re radical, you must be a lesbian.  If you’re a man, you’re the enemy.  Also, this quote in response to the release of Ms.: “For the first time you can read a publication that expresses total female sentiment, not sentiment based on some male publisher’s assumption that all women like to read about recipes, beauty tricks, wardrobe wizardry and entertaining.”  In particular, that line could be written today, just throw sex advice in that list.  It still boggles my mind that no women’s magazine tackles substantive topics, politics, writes juicy articles or in depth profiles in the manner of the men’s magazines.  Next: the new feminist writers of the blogosphere.  It’s curious to me that these forums exist almost exclusively online. The evolution is interesting though, the wider scope, broader acceptance.  And this: ”Perhaps most strikingly, there was a freewheeling fascination with celebrity culture and ‘reality’ television, even on the most radical sites. Instead of viewing pop culture as toxic propaganda, bloggers embraced it as a shared language, a complex code to be solved together, and not coincidentally, something fun.”   

New York Magazine, how do you know everything I want to read about? 

First, Steinem: A couple of things struck me about this article.  The infighting!  Oh my god.  Are we feminist enough? was a question constantly being asked.  And everyone had an opinion.  More than anything, Ms. magazine was successful because it was the product of a specific vision and adhered to that, regardless of whether it was popular or would alienate a certain audience.  Feminism is intrinsically alienating.  If you’re a mom, you’re not radical enough.  If you’re radical, you must be a lesbian.  If you’re a man, you’re the enemy.  Also, this quote in response to the release of Ms.: “For the first time you can read a publication that expresses total female sentiment, not sentiment based on some male publisher’s assumption that all women like to read about recipes, beauty tricks, wardrobe wizardry and entertaining.”  In particular, that line could be written today, just throw sex advice in that list.  It still boggles my mind that no women’s magazine tackles substantive topics, politics, writes juicy articles or in depth profiles in the manner of the men’s magazines. 

Next: the new feminist writers of the blogosphere.  It’s curious to me that these forums exist almost exclusively online. The evolution is interesting though, the wider scope, broader acceptance.  And this: ”Perhaps most strikingly, there was a freewheeling fascination with celebrity culture and ‘reality’ television, even on the most radical sites. Instead of viewing pop culture as toxic propaganda, bloggers embraced it as a shared language, a complex code to be solved together, and not coincidentally, something fun.”